Speak for Wolves

Press Conference & Watch 2020 Conference Sessions on Youtube!

Hello wolf advocates,
Thank you to all who attended last month’s 8th annual conference, and a huge thanks to all of the excellent speakers! If you missed it or want to re-watch a session, the recordings are now available on our YouTube channel.

We continue to closely watch the status of this year’s wolf hunts and state kill orders. Wisconsin approved a kill limit of 300 wolves in the state against their own biologists’ recommendations, but now face a lawsuit over the hunt.

Oregon issued another kill permit for the Lookout Mt pack, of whom they horrendously killed two pups last month, and Washington issued a kill order for up to two wolves of the Togo Pack. Wolf advocates must call attention to the ongoing state-sponsored wolf slaughter in Oregon and Washington!

Join us on Tuesday, Sept. 14th, 10am PDT for a press conference & virtual rally to demand the halt of state-sponsored wolf slaughter in Washington and Oregon.

Speak for Wolves, the Northwest Animal Rights Network (NARN), Predator Defense, and the Animal Rights Coalition- PDX are teaming up to host a Virtual Rally and Press Conference in response to the recent state of wolf management and the media’s silence on it.


Watch Conference Sessions on YouTube!

Recordings of these sessions are now available:


Get your collector t-shirt!

Available in our store!

A Speak for Wolves annual tradition, this year’s conference shirts are screenprinted by a local Portland artist on 100% organic cotton, sweatshop free, USA-made, unisex, soft jersey Royal Apparel tees in Pacific Blue color with gold ink. Sizes XS to XXL. Visit the store for this year’s t-shirts and more!

Announcing a special guest speaker at Speak for Wolves conference: Rain

Rain is the Director of FAMILY, a new short film asking Secretary of the Interior Deb Haaland to relist the wolf under the Endangered Species Act.

Join us for the 3-minute film screening followed by Q&A and conversation with Rain on the first day of the conference, Saturday, August 14th at 4pm PDT.

Additional speaker announcements and full conference schedule below!

all rights reserved by photographer

Rain Bear Stands Last is an acclaimed documentary film director. Two of his films have drawn national and international attention to the Murdered and Missing Indigenous Women and Girls crisis: Say Her Name and Somebody’s Daughter.

Rain currently serves as Executive Director, Global Indigenous Council, leading the policy positions and implementing the manifesto of one of the most effective current indigenous rights organizations; as Senior Advisor, Rocky Mountain Tribal Leaders Council, and as UN Ambassador, International Romani Union.


Speaker Announcement

Visit the program page for full schedule details and speaker bios. 

Erica Prather is an organizer on federal policy in Arizona and National Outreach Representative for Defenders of Wildlife.

Erica will advise on how best to advocate with decision makers. Take action, make a difference, and have your voice heard through the legislative process!


Stephen Capra of Footloose Montana is the former Executive Director of New Mexico Wild and worked to create two National Monuments and three wilderness areas in New Mexico. He started the Mexican wolf coalition and worked to end trapping in New Mexico. 

Stephen will give an overview on the wolf issue and reality check on Montana’s legislature and Governor.


Get your collector t-shirt!

Available in our store!

A Speak for Wolves annual tradition, this year’s conference shirts are screenprinted by a local Portland artist on 100% organic cotton, sweatshop free, USA-made, unisex, soft jersey Royal Apparel tees in Pacific Blue color with gold ink. Sizes XS to XXL.


Full Conference Program

All times are given in Pacific Daylight Time (UTC -7)

Saturday August 14th: 10 am – 4:30 pm PDT

  • 10 am  Welcome, Opening Remarks
  • 10:10 am  Corrine Nugent-Hayes, Poet, Wolf Advocate: Poetry reading: “When Shall These Mournings For Us End”
  • 10:15 am  Christopher Sebastian, Author, Researcher, Lecturer: Lone Wolf
  • 11:30 am  Zoë Hanley, Defenders of Wildlife: Innovating Predator-Livestock Non-Lethal Tools: Radio-Activated Guard Box 2.0
  • 1 pm  Michael Waasegiizhig Price, Great Lakes Indian Fish & Wildlife Commission: “Whatever Happens to the Wolves Will Happen to Us”: Cultural Reflections of the Relationship Between the Wolf and the Anishinaabe People
  • 1:45 pm  Sristi Kamal, Defenders of Wildlife: Oregon’s Wolves: Conflict and Coexistence
  • 3 pm  Stephen Capra, Footloose Montana: Update on Wolves in Montana
  • 3:30 pm  John Murtaugh, Defenders of Wildlife: Colorado’s Gray Wolf Reintroduction
  • 4 pm  “FAMILY” short film screening followed by Q&A with the Director, Rain Bear Stands Last, Filmmaker; Global Indigenous Council

Sunday August 15th: 10 am – 3:45 pm PDT

  • 10 am  Welcome, Day 2
  • 10:10 am  Anna Le, Biologist & Educator, Yellowstone National Park: The Harms of Gatekeeping Wildlife
  • 11 am  Quinn Read, Center for Biological Diversity: Fish & Wildlife Commission Reform
  • 1 pm  Panel: Jodi Habush Sinykin, Environmental Attorney; Samantha Bruegger, WildEarth Guardians; and Nancy Warren, National Wolfwatcher Coalition: Blueprints for Wolf Conservation Planning Using Science, Inclusivity & Ethical Practices
  • 1:40 pm  Erica Prather, Defenders of Wildlife: Take Action, Make a Difference, Have Your Voice Heard Through the Legislative Process
  • 2:30 pm  Sarah Hanneken, Animal Equality and Faunalytics: The Importance of Data for Effective Wildlife Advocacy
  • 3:10 pm  Panel: Airick, Hunt Saboteurs Association; Steph, Speak for Wolves: Using Direct Action as A Tactic for Saving Wildlife
  • 3:45 pm  Conference Closing

Speak for Wolves is a volunteer-run, nonprofit 501(c)3 organization, EIN 46-2867294

Meet 2 more of this weekend’s speakers: Sristi Kamal & John Murtaugh

The 8th annual Speak for Wolves conference will take place this weekend! We’re excited to host a diverse group of speakers working in wolf & wildlife advocacy from across the Western States and Great Lakes.

Don’t miss out on the latest science & policy updates, advocate tools, and activist tactics in the fight to save wolves.

Visit the program page for full schedule details and speaker bios. 

Join us on Saturday & Sunday, August 14-15!

Webinar access information will be sent to registrants later this week.


Speaker Announcements

Sristi Kamal is from India and grew up in a biodiversity hotspot with elephants, rhinos, leopards and tigers which sparked a childhood and lifelong passion for wildlife. She currently works for Defenders of Wildlife in their NW office of the Field Conservation Program. In her current role, she works to protect imperiled and native species in Oregon and their habitats, including wolves.

Sristi will talk about Oregon’s Wolves: Conflict and Coexistence—an update on the status of wolves in Oregon, Oregon’s wolf management policy and current instances of conflict and where we go from here.

John Murtaugh of Defenders of Wildlifebrings a lifetime of passion for wolf recovery to the Rockies and Plains as he works to restore wolves to the region. By working with stakeholders across the spectrum, he works to create a strong coalition of support, ensuring that wolves and people can coexist in the west.  

John will update us on Colorado’s Gray Wolf Reintroduction. In 2020, Colorado voters directed the Colorado Parks and Wildlife agency to begin a wolf reintroduction by the end of 2023. Now, the state has set forth a plan and has begun a process of advisement from key stakeholders, technical experts, and the public.


Conference T-shirts 

Available in our store!

A Speak for Wolves annual tradition, this year’s collector conference shirts are screenprinted by a local Portland artist on 100% organic cotton, sweatshop free, USA-made, unisex, soft jersey Royal Apparel tees in Pacific Blue color with gold ink. 

Buy yours now to support the conference!
Also available: Speak for Wolves stickers! Remaining stock of prior years’ shirts @ 50% off!


Speak for Wolves is a volunteer-run, nonprofit 501(c)3 organization, EIN 46-2867294

Make a Tax-Deductible Donation to Speak for Wolves

The Speak for Wolves conference is the longest standing, grassroots wildlife conference of its kind, thanks to our dedicated supporters. Speak for Wolves is a 100% volunteer-run 501(c)3 nonprofit organization, EIN 46-2867294.

The Issues

Credit: US Fish and Wildlife Service

Wolves once roamed freely across much of the land that is now called North America. Indigenous peoples actively managed the land responsibly, including lands that many in the conservation movement call “wilderness”. Starting in the 1500s through 1800s, European settlers, spreading across the continent, stole the land and its resources, committed genocide of indigenous peoples, and began exploiting wildlife to the point of extermination.

By the 1940s, wolves were extirpated from the landscape, thanks to government-sponsored bounty programs. 

In 1974, the gray wolf (Canis lupus) was listed on the federal Endangered Species Act. Wolves slowly began to disperse back into the northern reaches of the US from Canada, and in the 1990s, wolves were reintroduced to Yellowstone and Idaho. 

As wolves returned to states where they had once lived, state wildlife agencies developed wolf management plans under their own state Endangered Species Acts, working in tandem with the US Fish and Wildlife Service, which managed federal protections.

While wolf populations have slowly recovered in the 30 years since reintroduction, they still only occupy less than 10% of their historic range in the US. As wolf populations began to grow and conflicts arose with hunters and ranchers unhappy with this keystone predator returning to “their” land, states began removing wolves from local ESA protections and allowing wolf hunts. In 2020, the Trump administration removed the gray wolf from federal protection.

Those of us who are settlers must recognize how our long history of settler colonialism, white supremacy, and racist policies were driving forces that led us to where we are now: trying desperately to reverse the destruction of wildlife and the environment before it’s too late, as wildfires rage, climate change threatens our near future, and our culture wars divide us into those who want to save keystone species vs. those who want to keep ranching cows on public lands for our dinner plates.

To dig deeper, check out the videos and readings on our Learn page.

Credit: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Reforming Wildlife Management

Reenvision state fish & wildlife departments

Most state fish and wildlife departments have “providing opportunities for fishing & hunting” as part of their mission statements. In addition, since many hunters and anglers pay for hunting and fishing licenses, these groups tend to feel of sense of ownership toward their state Departments of Fish & Wildlife.  These groups in turn, pressure the Commissioners to focus on the interests of hunters and anglers.  As a result, these agencies serve the primary interest of “sportsmen”, while the interests of the members of the public that do not hunt, fish or trap are given less consideration.  More needs to be done to find alternative forms of funding and the public needs to be educated that their tax dollars do indeed fund a large percentage of Department budgets.  Fish & Wildlife Departments need to represent more than just special interest groups.

In Western States, the governors currently appoint fish and wildlife commissioners.  These Commissions have authority over agency policy, particularly predator management. Until we switch over to a process that prioritizes having Fish & Wildlife Commissions that are scientifically qualified, and represent more than just fishing & hunting interests, we will continue to see Commissioners that prioritize the interests of ranchers, hunters & anglers. 

Reduce grazing on federal public lands

Grazing is ecologically damaging to land in the arid West. Non-native livestock are responsible for soil compaction, destruction of wetlands and riparian zones, a decrease in water retention and aquifer recharge, soil erosion, flooding, and a net-loss of biodiversity. Livestock grazing contributes to the spread of harmful invasive plant species, which greatly affects the West’s historic fire regime. 

These destructive grazing practices are heavily subsidized by taxpayers every year to the tune of tens, if not hundreds, of millions of dollars. More work needs to be done to reduce and mitigate grazing on public lands.

Wildlife Services: Killing Funded by Your Tax Dollars

For a primer about Wildlife Services, read the 2015 HSUS report, “Wildlife Disservice: The USDA Wildlife Services’ Inefficient and Inhumane Wildlife Damage Management Program

Every year the USDA Wildlife Services kills millions of animals, including wolves. coyotes, black bears, mountain lions, bobcats, beavers, birds, and countless other species, including house pets. The agency is an indiscriminate killer that uses neck snares and foot hold traps, toxic cyanide (M44’s) and aerial gunning (helicopters) to slaughter native wildlife across the country. This agency historically and still primarily serves the interests of the livestock industry, at taxpayers’ expense.

Gray wolf recovery has been slow because the US federal government prematurely abandoned recovery efforts in order to appease powerful livestock and sportsmen interests. Currently, state fish and game agencies have authority over gray wolf “management”. State-sanctioned hunting, trapping/snaring, and hounding seasons have resulted in thousands of wolves being killed. Massing increases in killing in Wisconsin, Idaho, and Montana thanks to federal delisting and new laws passed in those states in 2021 threaten to decimate any progress that has been made on wolf recovery.

Ban trapping and snaring on federal public lands

Leg-hold traps, conibear traps, and neck snares are indiscriminate killers that have no place on federal public lands. There have been many incidents of dogs and endangered, non-target species being trapped, snared, and/or killed on public lands in states like Idaho and Montana. Some states currently require individuals to check their traps once every 72 hours, while other states do not require trappers to check them for days or weeks, or don’t have trap check time laws. Wildlife advocates should urge their elected leaders to introduce legislation that would ban leg-hold traps, conibear traps, and neck snares.

End wildlife derbies and the hunting of carnivores
Credit: G’Pa Bill via Wikimedia

The best available science suggests that carnivores, including gray wolves, are self-regulating species. Carnivores don’t need to be managed, they have evolved with their prey over thousands of years, with species populations constantly fluctuating. 

The livestock industry and sportsmen groups have continued to hold cruel wildlife derby contests “for fun”. The trapping, snaring, hounding, and trophy-hunting of carnivores runs counter to public sentiment and ethics. Much has been done over the years to work on banning these wildlife derbies, progress has been made, but there is so much work to be done.

Reprehensible Wolf Killings & Speaker Announcements

This week, the Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife shot two 3.5 month old Lookout Mountain pack wolf pups from a helicopter in response to private profit loss from livestock depredations.

This horrific killing of two innocent young pups is reprehensible. We encourage you to e-mail or call the ODFW offices to politely voice your disgust over this action to: odfw.commission@odfw.oregon.gov or (503) 947-6000.

While there has been much discouraging wolf news of late in Oregon, Montana, Idaho, and Wisconsin, there are also bright spots in the story of wolf recovery, such as reintroduction in Colorado and new packs establishing in California. 

Don’t miss out on the latest science & policy updates, advocate tools, and activist tactics in the fight to save wolves!

Join us on Saturday & Sunday, August 14-15!

Check out our program page for full schedule details and speaker bios. 
Space is limited! Webinar access information will be sent to registrants a few days before the conference.


2021 Speaker Announcements

Michael Waasegiizhig Price is the Traditional Ecological Knowledge Specialist at the Great Lakes Indian Fish and Wildlife Commission headquartered in Odanah, WI. He is Anishinaabe and an enrolled member of Wikwemikong First Nations in Canada.

Michael will tell the story of the historical journey and the relationship between the wolf and the Anishinaabe people of the Great Lakes region. As Anishinaabe cultural teachings tell us: “Whatever happens to the wolf will happen to Anishinaabe, and whatever happens to Anishinaabe will happen to the wolf.”


Panel: Using Direct Action as A Tactic for Saving Wildlife
What do we do when we’ve exhausted all legal tactics of stopping wildlife killing, but the killing continues?
This panel will feature seasoned direct action activists who have utilized non-violent direct action as a tactic to interfere with harassment or targeted killing of wildlife. Topics include using your own body as a form of protest to stop killing or to bring attention to the issue and participating in ongoing efforts to sabotage planned wildlife hunts.


Airick has been a wildlife advocate for over 36 years. He is a former Hunt Saboteur of 30 years.

Steph is a direct action activist with a long history of locking their body to things and dangling off stadiums, high-rise buildings, and 150 foot doug firs to call attention to state sponsored wolf slaughter, habitat destruction, and climate change.


2021 Conference T-shirts 

Available in our store!

A Speak for Wolves annual tradition, this year’s collector conference shirts are screenprinted by a local Portland artist on 100% organic cotton, sweatshop free, USA-made, unisex, soft jersey Royal Apparel tees in Pacific Blue color with gold ink. 

Buy yours now to support the conference!

Speak for Wolves Conference in less than two weeks!

With so much happening in the fight to save wolves this year, you don’t want to miss out on the latest info about wolf conservation.

This year’s online program will cover:

  • Updates on wolves in key states from the folks who are working on the frontlines of wolf conservation
  • Inclusion of BIPOC (Black, Indigenous, and People of Color) communities in wildlife education and wildlife management reform
  • Tools & tips for activists working to protect wolves, including: 
    • New Wolf Conservation Planning resource guides for advocates & agencies
    • Using data for effective advocacy tactics
    • Direct Action hunt/trap sabotage: experiences from the field
  • And more!

Check out our program page for full schedule details and speaker bios. 

Space is limited! Webinar access information will be sent to registrants a few days before the conference.


2021 Speaker Announcements

Ane Le is a passionate environmental educator, conservationist, aquatic biologist, and outdoor recreationist. She has spent the past few years in California, Oregon, Wyoming, Montana, and Colorado, working in freshwater and saltwater ecosystems, exploring public lands, engaging with local communities, and educating K-12 students about conservation efforts and the outdoors. Anna currently works as an educator in Yellowstone National Park, where she interacts with hundreds of individuals a day to educate about wildlife conservation.

Anna will talk about how gatekeeping wildlife/wolf watching and education ultimately harms the species while also affecting BIPOC and other underrepresented communities from being stewards in conservation.


Panel: Blueprints for Wolf Conservation Planning Using Science, Inclusivity & Ethical Practices

Samantha Bruegger, WildEarth Guardians; Jodi Habush Sinykin, Environmental Attorney; and Nancy Warren, National Wolfwatcher Coalition

The panel will share a set of Wolf Conservation Planning resources, based on best science, democratic processes, inclusivity, and ethics, which are the culmination of an intensive collaborative effort by multiple organizations, with input and critiques from a broad array of scientists, ethicists, retired and current agency professionals, Tribal biologists and representatives, and academic experts. Advocates will be provided information and ideas vital to wolf conservation planning, along with the academic and scientific research to back every recommendation made in the wolf planning resources.


2021 Conference T-shirts

Available in our store!

A Speak for Wolves annual tradition, this year’s collector conference shirts are screenprinted by a local Portland artist on 100% organic cotton, sweatshop free, USA-made, unisex, soft jersey Royal Apparel tees in Pacific Blue color with gold ink. 

Buy yours now to support the conference!

Speak for Wolves 2021: Space is limited, Register Now!

Speak for Wolves 2021 is less than a month away, and this year’s program is not to be missed! Get the latest state-by-state updates on wolves from the folks who are working on the frontlines of wolf conservation, engage with the histories of wildlife management and perception of wolves in society, and learn about new as well as tried & true tactics in the fight to protect wolves.

Check out our program page for the full schedule. Space is limited! Webinar access information will be sent to registrants a few days before the conference. 


2021 Speaker Announcements

Quinn Read is the Oregon Policy Director for the Center for Biological Diversity. She works to protect and restore Oregon’s imperiled species and landscapes. She is a member of Oregon’s Environmental Justice Task Force and served on Governor Kate Brown’s Environmental Equity Committee.

In her talk on Fish & Wildlife Commission Reform, Quinn will take a close look at how state commissions shape fish and wildlife conservation policy, and how the enduring stain of colonialism and white supremacy that prioritizes the “legacy” of sport hunting, trapping and fishing continues to permeate decision making.


Corrine Nugent-Hayes, a longtime Speak for Wolves attendee and supporter, will open the conference with a reading of her poem, “When Shall These Mournings For Us End“. In mourning the death of another Yellowstone Wolf, 1155Mb Corrine had to wait until O’ Great Creator began sending through her these Honorable & Humbled Words. Aho.

“Remembering my teachings as a young Native girl proved important while watching the Eco-system’s full cycle of all Humanity. Mankind, Animal Kind were created to show the world how true oneness must work together. A lesson I continued as I raised my own Wolves while having respect for all kind. Afforded many gifts from Our Creator, I learned I had such passion for life in a whole I began to love Art & Creative writing.”


2021 Conference T-shirts 

Available in our store!

This year’s shirts are screenprinted by a local Portland artist on 100% organic cotton, sweatshop free, USA-made, unisex, soft jersey Royal Apparel tees in Pacific Blue color with gold ink. 

Buy yours now to support the conference!

Register for Speak for Wolves 2021

2021 Speaker Announcements

Wolf Advocates,
We’re looking forward to seeing you (online) August 14-15 for Speak for Wolves 2021 to learn about the latest status of wolves in the US, effective wildlife advocacy tools, history of wolf vilification, and more! Check out our program page for the full schedule and register now to reserve your spot! Space is limited. Webinar access information will be sent to registrants a few days before the conference. 

Zoë Hanley leads Defenders of Wildlife’s coexistence initiatives in the Northwest, working directly with communities sharing the landscape with imperiled species like grizzly bears and gray wolves. For the past decade, Zoë has worked to deepen human understanding of carnivore ecology and develop strategies for human-carnivore coexistence.

Zoë will talk about Innovating Predator-Livestock Non-Lethal Tools: RAG Box 2.0: The radio-activated guard (RAG) box was developed in the late 1990s as a visual and acoustic device to deter predators from killing livestock in small pastures. However, the design had never been standardized; devices were expensive, lacked protection for sensitive radio-collar frequencies and were prone to malfunction and user error. To address these issues, we partnered with engineers and multiple state wildlife agencies in 2020-21 to develop the RAG box 2.0. We conducted preliminary field tests to evaluate the efficacy of this updated non-lethal tool in Washington and Oregon. The results will help determine the appropriate uses of this tool and add to a growing body of scientific studies that support the use of humane tools for predator-livestock conflict resolution.

Lynn Okita is a longtime wildlife enthusiast and advocate and has a special interest in wolves. She is a member of the WA Department of Fish & Wildlife Wolf Advisory Group (WAG), and advocates for coexistence with wolves in this diverse stakeholder group representing conservationists, livestock producers, hunters, and outdoor recreationists. She is the Board Chair of Western Wildlife Outreach, a nonprofit based in WA, and is a member of the Pacific Wolf Coalition Steering Committee. 

In the past, Lynn volunteered for Olympic Wildlife Rescue in western WA (now closed), and at the University of Alaska, Fairbanks, Large Animal Research Station where reindeer, caribou, and musk oxen were studied. She is a nurse practitioner and has worked in various healthcare settings over the years. Lynn will give an update on the Status of Wolves in Washington.

2021 Collector Conference T-shirts 

Available in our store!

This year’s shirts are screenprinted by a local Portland artist on 100% organic cotton, sweatshop free, USA-made, unisex, soft jersey Royal Apparel tees in Pacific Blue color with gold ink.

Buy yours now to support the conference!

Remaining stock of 2019 and 2020 shirts are 50% off.

In honor of Pride month and to support our LGBTQ community, 10% of all merch sales in June will be donated to The Trevor Project.

Good News & Speaker Announcements

Despite all of the recent bad news about anti-wolf legislation, there has also been good news:

  • California just announced the new Beckwourth Pack in Plumas country, the third pack to establish in the state in 100 years;
  • Colorado reported the first wolf pups born in the state since the 1940s;
  • And just this week, a coalition of environmental groups filed notice of intent to sue Montana over the likelihood that the state’s new wolf snaring and trapping laws will also kill endangered Canada Lynx and Grizzlies.

Join us August 14-15 online for Speak for Wolves 2021 to learn about the latest status of wolves in the US, effective wildlife advocacy tools, history of wolf vilification, and more! Register now to reserve your spot!


2021 Collector Conference T-shirts 

Available in our store!

This year’s shirts are screenprinted by a local Portland artist on 100% organic cotton, sweatshop free, USA-made, unisex, soft jersey Royal Apparel tees in Pacific Blue color with gold ink.

Buy yours now to support the conference!

Remaining stock of 2019 and 2020 shirts are 50% off.

In honor of Pride month and to support our LGBTQ community, 10% of all merch sales in June will be donated to The Trevor Project.


2021 Speaker Announcements

Christopher Sebastian is a journalist, technical writer, and digital media specialist who uses pop culture, media studies, political science, and social psychology to examine human relationships with other animals.

Sebastian will talk about the history of how wolves got to be demonized and vilified, who benefits from this vilification, and why some academics call the divided public opinions on wolf preservation “the abortion issue of wildlife.”

Sarah Hanneken, Legal Advocacy Counsel at Animal Equality, is an attorney specializing in litigation and legislation impacting animals. Sarah serves on the board of directors of Faunalytics, a nonprofit that conducts essential research related to animal advocacy, maintains an online research library, and directly supports advocates and advocacy organizations in their work to improve the lives of animals.

Every wildlife advocate has experienced the frustration of feeling ineffective. The passion that drives us to work so hard on behalf of vulnerable species can also lead to burnout and despair if results aren’t achieved. Thankfully, data exists that can help wildlife advocates understand how people think about and respond to different advocacy tactics, providing us with the best strategies to inspire changes to hearts and minds – changes that are necessary for us to ultimately improve the world for wild creatures.

Register for Speak for Wolves 2021